Please join us on Mondays once a month to learn from marine and aquatic educators and scientists. Speakers will share experiences, educational tips and stories from the field. Please register each month to get the Zoom link to the event. Please contact wmoses@highline.edu if you have any questions or problems with the registration or link.

Register for the May 10 Speaker Series

Not a member? Membership expired? Make sure to join or renew now so you don’t miss out on these fabulous events!

Header image photo credit: Louise Page


Upcoming Speakers

Monday, May 10th 6:30pm

Seabed Mining: “The Dawn of an Industry” and the need for a precautionary approach—Lee First, Co-Founder Twin Harbors Waterkeeper, and Liz Schotman, Washington Regional Manager Surfrider Foundation. Washington State’s waters contain known mineral deposits, and there is increasing pressure to begin mining the ocean floor in some areas of the world.  Given the present reality of rising ocean temperatures and acidification, nearshore marine waters and coastal communities along the Pacific do not need another threat. Oregon banned ocean mining in their state waters in 1991.  Attend this presentation to learn why Washington should close their state waters to seabed mining. This step is a necessary precaution for coastal towns and cities where fishing and tourism depend on these valuable but vulnerable waters for their livelihoods.

Register Now


More speakers will be posted as they are scheduled—if you would like to present please contact Giovannina Souers at giovanninah2o@gmail.com


Speaker Archive

April 2021

Astonishing Annelids—The COVID-19 pandemic challenged marine educators at all academic levels to provide their students with an engaging on-line educational experience. Dr. Louise Page, Associate Professor in the Department of Biology at the University of Victoria (who was recently recognized by a UVic Teaching Excellence Award), didn’t miss a beat in preparing videos to substitute for the hands-on laboratory section of her Invertebrate Biology course. The decades of Louise’s passion for research and teaching about invertebrates permeate this work. Join us as she presents excerpts from her annelid lab, which showcase the astonishing diversity of morphology, behaviour and lifestyle among annelids.


March 2021

Investigating Crayfish + Freshwater Ecosystems Online—Learn to engage students in fascinating crayfish studies and water quality monitoring in this presentation with partners from The River Mile Network. Janice Elvidge from the National Park Service will team up with Rick Reynolds from Engaging Every Student and Jim Ekins from the University of Idaho Extension Service IDAH2O Master Water Stewards program to step you through student activities including scientific investigations in your local watershed to benefit people and wildlife. Learn methods to monitor native and invasive crayfish, as well as a variety of factors that impact water quality, while meeting the Next Generation Science Standards and Common Core State Standards. Learn about ways to participate with The River Mile’s Crayfish Study project helping biologists and wildlife managers, and how different tools can be used to collect, analyze, and share data and student observations.

Resources from The River Mile Network
Resources from IDAH2O
Other Resources

February 2020

Virtual Field Trips:Exploring and Sharing Our Local Ecology—Rosemary Anderson High School science teacher and NAME President, Kay Shoemaker, gave a presentation on how to conduct field trips in these oh-so-atypical times so that you can still engage your students in the wonders and magic of the natural world, even while we’re all sitting in front of computer screens for ten hours a day.

Resources

January 2021

Kayaking the Salish Sea During a Pandemic—WA-NAME Co-Directors Giovannina Souers (Environmental Education Program Supervisor City of Seattle) and Woody Moses (Highline College Biology Instructor) spent six weeks paddling over three hundred miles through the Salish Sea from West Seattle to the San Juans and back to Hood Canal. Learn what it took to do the trip, the challenges and surprises they faced and how they embraced adventure and uncertainty in the midst of the Covid-19 Pandemic.


December 2020

Monitoring Axial SeaMount: Research techniques for 1500 meters Beneath the SurfaceFawn Custer, CoastWatch Citizen Science Trainer will lead a fun holiday activity to start out the night followed by Bill Hanshumaker, former National Marine Educators Association Rep and OSU Researcher Emeritus talking about monitoring an axial seamount and research techniques for 1500 meters beneath the surface.


Please join us on Saturday, February 20 for our Mid-winter Board Meeting!

Our Mid-winter Board Meeting is a chance for us to check in with the NAME board, share what NAME has been up to in the last few months, and plan out the rest of our year. We will be discussing our upcoming NAME/CaNOE virtual conference, as well as our plans to host a national conference in Bellingham, WA in 2023!

Saturday, February 20
3:00-6:00pm PST
Location: Online via Zoom

Request Meeting Link


Please take a moment to review the minutes from last year’s meeting, linked below.

2020 Summer Board Meeting Minutes – DRAFT

UPDATE—This event was cancelled due to the COVID-19 situation.

Northwest Aquatic and Marine Educators & Oregon Shores Conservation Coalition present our 11th Annual “Sharing the Coast Conference”

When: March 13-15, 2020
Where: Southwestern Oregon Community College, Coos Bay, Oregon

Schedule & Information

Download the full schedule here.

Friday night: FREE! OPEN TO PUBLIC! Dr. Eric Steig, University of Washington, “The Future of Ice: What We Do (and Don’t) Know About Climate Change in Polar Regions” Hales Center for the Performing Arts, Doors open at 6

Saturday: Doors open at 8:30 AM for registration, conference begins at 9:00 AM. Each day features lectures, workshops. Lunch included.

Saturday evening: 5:30 PM Dave’s Pizza—Appetizers Provided by NAME and CoastWatch, No-host Happy Hour, King Tide Wrap-Up Speakers—Nick Tealer and Jesse Jones, & of course Trivia Night.

Sunday: Various field experiences including Charleston Sea Life Center, South Slough NERR, and more!

Conference price: Varies according to membership status

PDUs available or Certificate of Participation for students. Registration is required for the majority of the conference on Saturday and Sunday. Morning and afternoon refreshments will be provided as well as Saturday lunch.

Register Now

Questions? Please contact Fawn Custer: 541-270-0027 or envtgsldrfawn@aol.com or Jesse@oregonshores.org

I have been a marine educator for over 35 years.  Besides working with various school and scout groups, I have the opportunity to work with over 1300 amazing volunteers along the Oregon coast who have adopted a mile of beach and are asked to report officially, quarterly, on the state of their beach. My job is to make sure our volunteers are introduced to the most recent research, coastal concerns and interesting findings on the beaches they’ll be visiting.

I am currently NAME Oregon Treasurer, Past Oregon Director, and a Past NAME President (2011-2012). I’ve been a member since 1993 or 1994, since I helped with the 1992 conference as an employee for Sea Grant at Hatfield Marine Science Center. I have found my contacts in NAME to be very beneficial to my success as a marine educator.  We always have a wonderful time exploring our water world!

This spring I’m looking forward to going to Qatar to visit my daughter and family, go to the beach and check out the different marine organisms there, then to Sri Lanka to check out the beaches there, go on a Blue Whale watching tour and visit the sea turtle rescue center.  For the summer,  I’m looking forward to hanging with my buds from afar, participating in some of the freshwater experiences and, of course, the banquet/auction at our annual conference.

Oregon CoastWatch is celebrating its 25th year of collecting data along the 362 miles of coastline.  We will be hosting various events throughout the year to commemorate the commitment of our volunteers.  We will be kicking this off with our annual “Sharing the Coast Conference”, which is celebrating the 10th year of our partnership with the Oregon Chapter of NAME.  This year, Cannon Beach and the Haystack Rock Awareness Program in Cannon Beach, Oregon are hosting it.  We would love to have our awesome NAME members attend.  To register or for more information about CoastWatch or the conference, feel free to contact me at fawn@oregonshores.org  or 541.270.0027.

Save the Date: July 29-August 2, 2018, Portland, Oregon

The NAME-Oregon team is hard at work planning an exciting conference in 2018! Please check back for more details about the conference—including presentations, lodging, and registration information—as they become available.

The Oregon Coast STEM Hub promotes integrated science, technology, engineering and math education and serves coastal teachers, students and communities.  It is one of six Regional STEM Hubs funded in 2014-2015 by the Oregon Department of Education.  The Oregon Coast STEM Hub is centered at OSU’s Hatfield Marine Science Center in Newport and serves the entire Oregon coast region with partners.

This coast based STEM Hub is working to provide professional development for teachers and partners in effective practices focusing on STEM integration and Project Based Learning.  K-14 student experiences in the classroom and field are supported by providing connections to STEM professionals, equipment and resources to carry out STEM related activities and making opportunities to showcase student created designs and STEM projects.  This is all accomplished by created a network of resources, programs and professionals to support STEM learning for students that is housed on the Oregon Coast STEM Hub website which serves as a clearinghouse for connecting these community resources with schools.

NAME is already an official partner of the Oregon Coast STEM Hub, but we are looking to expand the network of available resources!  Learn how your organization can share STEM resources, events, and more to help foster student STEM experiences:  http://oregoncoaststem.oregonstate.edu/book/how-plug

Oregon Coast Quests is a place-based education program at Oregon Sea Grant that uses clue-directed hunts to get people outside exploring their communities.  All that is needed to go on a self-guided Quest is a pencil, a set of directions, and a sense of adventure!  Follow the directions, collect the clues, and find the hidden Quest box.  Sign the guest book, stamp your page to prove you made it, and then re-hide the box for the next person to discover.  Currently, there are 26 active Quests in Lincoln, Coos and Benton counties, and the directions can be found in The Oregon Coast Quests Book, 2013-2014 Edition (available for $10 at Powell’s Books and local retailers).  Nearly 6000 logs have been made in hidden boxes since 2007.

Questing is fun and educational for adults and children, residents and tourists, families and school groups, and other curious free-choice learners.    Some Quests focus on natural history, and lead along estuarine, sandy beach or coastal forest trails.  On other Quests, you might explore a downtown historic district, a pioneer cemetery, a working waterfront, or a fish hatchery.  Many Quests were made by park rangers, naturalists or educators, but 10 Quests were made by youth in school or afterschool programs.

Visit the Oregon Coast Quests website (http://hmsc.oregonstate.edu/visitor/oregon-coast-quests) to learn more about the location and focus of each available Quest, locate a bookseller, learn about Quest-building workshops, download Sample Quests, and to obtain tips for Questing with school groups.