Please join us on Mondays once a month to learn from marine and aquatic educators and scientists. Speakers will share experiences, educational tips and stories from the field. Please register each month to get the Zoom link to the event. Please contact wmoses@highline.edu if you have any questions or problems with the registration or link.

Register for the June 14 Speaker Series

Not a member? Membership expired? Make sure to join or renew now so you don’t miss out on these fabulous events!


Upcoming Speakers

Monday, June 14th 6:30pm

Frozen Sunlight Series: Connecting Ecological Research with Indigenous Knowledge—Janet Clarke, Education Director at the Sitka Sound Science Center

The Frozen Sunlight series includes easy to ship educational kits for secondary and adult learners. The topics focus on energy transfer in ocean ecosystems by weaving together current ecological research with Alaska Native cultural wisdom.  The first Frozen Sunlight kit titled “Algae Connects Us” includes a beautiful film featuring the perspectives of Sitka Tribe of Alaska cultural liaison, Chuck Miller and University of California, Santa Cruz PhD candidate and marine ecologist, Lauren Bell.  Information about identifying and collecting seaweed is provided and the materials included in the package allow students to collect and press algae for use in collections or art.

The Frozen Sunlight series is funded by the Biomedical Learning and Student Training (BLaST) program at University of Alaska, Fairbanks.

Register Now!


We will be taking a break for the summer but we’re excited to return in the fall with a whole new line-up of speakers! If you would like to present, please contact Giovannina Souers at giovanninah2o@gmail.com


Speaker Archive

May 2021

Seabed Mining: “The Dawn of an Industry” and the need for a precautionary approachLee First, Co-Founder of Twin Harbors Waterkeeper, and Liz Schotman, Washington Regional Manager Surfrider Foundation. Washington State’s waters contain known mineral deposits, and there is increasing pressure to begin mining the ocean floor in some areas of the world.  Given the present reality of rising ocean temperatures and acidification, nearshore marine waters and coastal communities along the Pacific do not need another threat. Oregon banned ocean mining in their state waters in 1991.  Attend this presentation to learn why Washington should close their state waters to seabed mining. This step is a necessary precaution for coastal towns and cities where fishing and tourism depend on these valuable but vulnerable waters for their livelihoods.


April 2021

Astonishing Annelids—The COVID-19 pandemic challenged marine educators at all academic levels to provide their students with an engaging on-line educational experience. Dr. Louise Page, Associate Professor in the Department of Biology at the University of Victoria (who was recently recognized by a UVic Teaching Excellence Award), didn’t miss a beat in preparing videos to substitute for the hands-on laboratory section of her Invertebrate Biology course. The decades of Louise’s passion for research and teaching about invertebrates permeate this work. Join us as she presents excerpts from her annelid lab, which showcase the astonishing diversity of morphology, behaviour and lifestyle among annelids.


March 2021

Investigating Crayfish + Freshwater Ecosystems Online—Learn to engage students in fascinating crayfish studies and water quality monitoring in this presentation with partners from The River Mile Network. Janice Elvidge from the National Park Service will team up with Rick Reynolds from Engaging Every Student and Jim Ekins from the University of Idaho Extension Service IDAH2O Master Water Stewards program to step you through student activities including scientific investigations in your local watershed to benefit people and wildlife. Learn methods to monitor native and invasive crayfish, as well as a variety of factors that impact water quality, while meeting the Next Generation Science Standards and Common Core State Standards. Learn about ways to participate with The River Mile’s Crayfish Study project helping biologists and wildlife managers, and how different tools can be used to collect, analyze, and share data and student observations.

Resources from The River Mile Network
Resources from IDAH2O
Other Resources

February 2020

Virtual Field Trips:Exploring and Sharing Our Local Ecology—Rosemary Anderson High School science teacher and NAME President, Kay Shoemaker, gave a presentation on how to conduct field trips in these oh-so-atypical times so that you can still engage your students in the wonders and magic of the natural world, even while we’re all sitting in front of computer screens for ten hours a day.

Resources

January 2021

Kayaking the Salish Sea During a Pandemic—WA-NAME Co-Directors Giovannina Souers (Environmental Education Program Supervisor City of Seattle) and Woody Moses (Highline College Biology Instructor) spent six weeks paddling over three hundred miles through the Salish Sea from West Seattle to the San Juans and back to Hood Canal. Learn what it took to do the trip, the challenges and surprises they faced and how they embraced adventure and uncertainty in the midst of the Covid-19 Pandemic.


December 2020

Monitoring Axial SeaMount: Research techniques for 1500 meters Beneath the SurfaceFawn Custer, CoastWatch Citizen Science Trainer will lead a fun holiday activity to start out the night followed by Bill Hanshumaker, former National Marine Educators Association Rep and OSU Researcher Emeritus talking about monitoring an axial seamount and research techniques for 1500 meters beneath the surface.


Please join us on Saturday, February 20 for our Mid-winter Board Meeting!

Our Mid-winter Board Meeting is a chance for us to check in with the NAME board, share what NAME has been up to in the last few months, and plan out the rest of our year. We will be discussing our upcoming NAME/CaNOE virtual conference, as well as our plans to host a national conference in Bellingham, WA in 2023!

Saturday, February 20
3:00-6:00pm PST
Location: Online via Zoom

Request Meeting Link


Please take a moment to review the minutes from last year’s meeting, linked below.

2020 Summer Board Meeting Minutes – DRAFT

UPDATE—This event has been cancelled due to the COVID-19 situation.

Come Razor Clamming with NAME!

April 10-12 Copalis Beach, WA

Washington NAME will be heading out to the coast on Friday, April 10, 2020 for a weekend of festivities and marine biology.

We arise early Saturday, April 11, to hunt for the mighty Pacific Razor Clam, Siliqua patula. Joined by throngs of like-minded, bivalve-loving Homo sapiens, we use shovels and guns (clam guns, that is) to extract the beasties from their sandy homes before the tide and surf fill our rubber boots with icy saltwater.

The rest of the day is spent cleaning the clams, beachcombing for treasures and hanging with like-minded marine-loving folks. Then Saturday night, we feast on clams while we tell tales and sing songs of the glorious hunt. If the Homo sapiens haven’t been too greedy, we get to repeat the hunt Sunday morning before packing up and driving back to the safety of our (mostly) sand-free domiciles.

In addition, Friday night, April 10, there will be a FREE Razor Clam Biology and Ecology presentation by local tidepooling and beachcombing expert, Alan Rammer, at Beachwood Resort, 3009 WA-109, Copalis Beach, WA 98535.

For more info, please contact Woody Moses at wmoses@highline.edu for details.

Hope to see you there!

Join us for a “Pacific Seas Snooze” Overnight at the Point Defiance Zoo and Aquarium

Saturday November 16, 2019

Register Now!

Location: 5400 N Pearl St. Tacoma
Time: 7:00 pm Saturday – 9:30 am Sunday
Ages: Participants must be at least 5 years old

NAME Members: Adults: $40, Children: $25
Non-Members: Adults: $45, Children: $30

(Breakfast included; bring your own snacks; eat dinner beforehand)

Spend an evening immersing yourselves in the watery world of wildlife found along the Pacific coast from Alaska to Baja. See what’s in store in the SEA Lab and sleep with the hammerhead sharks, spotted eagle rays, and green sea turtles in the new Pacific Seas Aquarium. Maximum of 40 participants.

Saturday Evening

  • Arrive at 7:00 pm
  • Welcome to Baja Bay!
  • Visit Rocky Shores
  • Experience the Tidal Touch Zone
  • Explore the Pacific Seas Aquarium
  • Marine Lab in the new SEA Lab!
Sunday Morning

  • Wake up at 6:30 am and pack up belongings
  • Eat breakfast in the Plaza Café
  • Visit the South Pacific Aquarium
  • TBD
  • Depart at about 9:30 am or stay longer!

Contact Woody Moses (wmoses@highline.edu) with your inquiries!!!

Spaces are limited!

It was a fun and educational evening for WA NAMERS at the recent Whale Trail event at West Seattle’s C&P Coffeehouse on December 4, 2018. Celebrating the return of the Southern Resident Killer Whales (SRKW) to Puget Sound, The Whale Trail, hosted an evening of presentations dedicated to our favorite, local cetaceans. Led by Whale Trail Founder and Director, Donna Sandstrom, the evening started off with a talk by Marc Sears and his daughter Maya, who have been documenting SRKW activities off of West Seattle for over forty years. They spoke about K-Pod’s recent visit to our waters, discussing how they assess the apparent health of the animals, including how they collect their fecal samples (that’s science folks). But the highlight was a GoPro video of an astounding recent display by K-Pod off of Alki Point, complete with breaches, tail lobs and spy hops. It left the whole crowd speechless.

The final presentation, by Dr. Clement Furlong (U.W. Professor of Genome Sciences), looked at how marine mammals are at particular risk to contamination by organophosphate pesticides because they lack the genes necessary for detoxification. Unfortunately, these pesticides, particularly Chlorpyrifos, are still widely used are certainly making their way into Puget Sound. Dr. Furlong encouraged everyone there to contact their representatives to get these chemicals banned, not just for the orcas’ sake, but for our health as well. For more on Dr. Furlong’s research on the effects of organophosphates, follow this link.

After the event, several of us met a local watering hole for a recap of the evening’s lessons and to discuss future WA NAME events, including WA NAME 2019 next August in Pt. Townsend, WA. If you’d like to get involved in future WA NAME events, including preparation for WA NAME 2019, feel free to contact Woody Moses (wmoses@highline.edu) or Maile Sullivan (mailesul@uw.edu). Hope to see next time!

Please join us for State of the Salish Sea—A Virtual Tour with Chrys Bertolotto, Natural Resource Programs Manager, WSU Snohomish County Extension.

Saturday February 4, 2017
12:00 pm – 12:45 pm

Highline College MaST Center (located near Redondo Beach Park)

The Salish Sea stretches from northern Vancouver Island south to Olympia, Washington and is nestled between the Cascade and Olympic Mountains.  Come learn about the coastal processes that shape the landforms we see, as well as glimpse the wide diversity of animals that the region supports.  We’ll assess several of the environmental indicators of health for the region and consider actions we can all take to leave a positive legacy of clean water, robust wildlife populations and natural areas that we can all enjoy.

For directions and more information on the MaST Center please visit http://mast.highline.edu/

Photo by Gary Purves

Date: Saturday, January 28 – Sunday, January 29, 2017

Address: 5400 N Pearl St., Tacoma, WA

Cost: $30 NAME members & $40 Non-NAME members, if registered by January 13th.

Kids under 2 are free and kids under 10 are half price. All you have to do is e-mail: wmoses@highline.edu  to get your spot reserved and then pay at the door. Overnight fee is a donation to Washington NAME and pays for your dinner. Registration after January 13th or at the door is $40 member and $50 non-member.

Space is limited!! Please register before January 13th so we know you are coming!!