News and Events

For more information on events in Oregon or if you have an event to share, please contact our Oregon Director, Jenna Kulluson, at oregonname@gmail.com


Join us in Newport for our Annual Sharing the Coast Conference 
March 13-15, 2015

For the past eight years, CoastWatch has partnered with the Northwest Aquatic and Marine Educators to produce the Sharing the Coast Conference. This is a chance to absorb a great deal of background information relating to coastal science and natural history. The conference is designed to serve both CoastWatchers and other conservationists, teachers and interpreters who belong to NAME and interested community members.  

This year’s Sharing the Coast comes up March 13-15 at the Hatfield Marine Science Center in Newport. Please make plans to join us. Online registration has now begun: tinyurl.com/STCC2015

This year’s conference will include talks on everything from marine mammals to seabirds to marine debris, and information on citizen science projects ranging from plankton to sea stars to whales. Field trips will explore various aspects of citizen science. The conference kicks off with a Friday evening talk that is free and open to all. Marine mammalogist Sheanna Steingass will discuss efforts by scientists to learn more about our marine mammal populations, including her own research on harbor seals and coastal ecology. Our traditional Saturday evening party will feature no-host food and libations, a mystery speaker and the usual cutthroat trivia game. More details will appear on the Oregon Shores site shortly. For now, mark your calendars and make it a priority to seize this opportunity to advance your skills and reconnect with NAME members. You can attend just the Friday evening presentation or the activities on Saturday or Sunday separately, but join us for the entire, packed weekend if you can.

Sharing the Coast Conference 2015 Flyer
Sharing the Coast Conference Registration form

Schedule & Information

Friday night: FREE! OPEN TO PUBLIC Lecture from Marine Mammalogist Sheanna Steingass Hennings Auditorium Hatfield Marine Science Center.  Doors open at 6:30 PM

Saturday and Sunday:  lectures and workshops are held at the Hatfield Marine Science Center: 2030 SE Marine Science Drive, Newport, OR 97365.  Doors open at 8:30 AM for registration, conference begins at 9:00 AM

Saturday evening:  No-host Happy Hour & Trivia Night Beginning at 5:00 PM.  Rogue Brewer's on the Bay: 2320 OSU Drive, Newport, OR 97365

Conference price:  $20 for members | $40 for non-members | Teacher PDUs available
Registration is required for the majority of the conference on Saturday and Sunday.
Morning refreshments will be provided both days as well as Saturday lunch.

For more information please visit: www.oregonshores.org
Registration: tinyurl.com/STCC2015

Questions?  Please contact Fawn Custer:  541-270-0027 or fawn@oregonshores.org


Oregon Coast STEM Hub

The Oregon Coast STEM Hub promotes integrated science, technology, engineering and math education and serves coastal teachers, students and communities.  It is one of six Regional STEM Hubs funded in 2014-2015 by the Oregon Department of Education.  The Oregon Coast STEM Hub is centered at OSU's Hatfield Marine Science Center in Newport and serves the entire Oregon coast region with partners.

This coast based STEM Hub is working to provide professional development for teachers and partners in effective practices focusing on STEM integration and Project Based Learning.  K-14 student experiences in the classroom and field are supported by providing connections to STEM professionals, equipment and resources to carry out STEM related activities and making opportunities to showcase student created designs and STEM projects.  This is all accomplished by created a network of resources, programs and professionals to support STEM learning for students that is housed on the Oregon Coast STEM Hub website which serves as a clearinghouse for connecting these community resources with schools.  

NAME is already an official partner of the Oregon Coast STEM Hub, but we are looking to expand the network of available resources!  Learn how your organization can share STEM resources, events, and more to help foster student STEM experiences:  http://oregoncoaststem.oregonstate.edu/book/how-plug 

For more information on events in Washington or if you have an event to share, please contact our Washington co-Directors, Amy Sprenger and Maille Sullivan, at washington@pacname.org


Science Behind Sustainable Seafood curriculum from NOAA AK Fisheries Science Center

The NOAA Fisheries Alaska Fisheries Science Center (AFSC) has developed a high school curriculum titled "science behind sustainable seafood."

The curriculum has six lessons that illustrate the importance of responsibly managing a natural resource and how scientific information is necessary to manage responsibly. All lessons are aligned to National standards and Ocean Literacy Principles. Each lesson has supporting powerpoint files, images, data and/or extra reading materials. The lessons are designed to inspire your own lessons, can be used individually or together to form a multi-week seafood science experience.

Lesson 1 - Fishing for the future
Learn why responsible resource management is important to ensuring sustainable seafood.
Lesson 2 - How many fish are there?
Learn how difficult it is to estimate fish populations and the complexities of counting fish in the ocean.
Lesson 3 - Age Matters!
Learn about the aspects of fish biology that are important to sustainable harvesting, like the age of a fish or how old they are when they first reproduce.
Lesson 4 - Survival in a dangerous environment!
Learn why understanding what happens throughout a fish's life history is important to understanding the size of a population.
Lesson 5 - Solving the ecosystem puzzle.
Learn how ecosystem interactions are linked to the health of a fish population.
Lesson 6 - Responsible management
Learn how an integrated process helps keep U.S. seafood sustainable. This is a role playing activity where students conduct a mock Fishery Management Council meeting to determine the annual limit for a fish species.

These lessons use species from Alaska, but they can be easily modified using species from all regions of the U.S. to reflect the differences in scientific strategies and/or management strategies based on their respective species life histories.

http://www.afsc.noaa.gov/education/Activities/sbss_module.htm

Feedback is always welcome!


Around Puget Sound: Evenings with Invertebrates—Low-Tide and Dockside programs

Local groups are hosting evening programs this winter spying on those marine invertebrates we all love, here are a few we found:

Seattle: Seattle Aquarium Beach Naturalists: http://www.seattleaquarium.org/night-beach-walk

Gig Harbor: Harbor Wildwatch: http://www.harborwildwatch.org/programs/pier-into-the-night/

Tacoma: Foss Waterway and Seaport: http://www.fosswaterwayseaport.org/education-programs/family-activities

For more information on events in BC or if you have an event to share, please contact our BC co-Directors, Sarah Board and Clair Vial, at bc@pacname.org
For more information on events in Alaska or if you have an event to share, please contact our Alaska Director, Marilyn Sigman, at alaska@pacname.org