2018 Registration Information

We will be offering the following registration options:

Full Conference Registration—includes all sessions, events and meals* from Sunday evening, July 29 through Thursday lunch, August 2, including the NAME Awards Banquet and Auction. *Conference registration does not include dinner on Monday & Tuesday evenings, or any of the freshwater field trips on Tuesday.

Single-day Registration—includes all sessions, plus lunch and coffee breaks only on the day/s registered. Available for Mon, Wed, Thu only. Registration for Monday includes the Sunday Reception & Dinner at the Oregon Zoo. Registration for Wednesday includes the Coastal Field Trip & NAME Awards Banquet and Auction.

NAME Member Non-member
Full Conference
Regular (beginning May 1, 2017) $275 $300
Single Day
Mon (7/30), Wed (8/1), or Thu (8/2) $125 $150
Extras
Sunday Reception & Dinner at the Oregon Zoo – guest ticket $35
NAME Awards Banquet and Auction (Wednesday) – guest ticket $30

Cancellation of Conference Registration:
Cancellations submitted by July 23, 2018 will be refunded.
No refunds for cancellations after July 23, 2018.

If you are paying by check (US funds, payable to Northwest Aquatic and Marine Educators) or purchase order, please send your payment to NAME-Oregon:

Fawn Custer – NAME Oregon Treasurer
PO Box 90
Seal Rock, OR 97376

541.270.0027
envtgsldrfawn@aol.com

Fax 541.563.6851 – upon request 

2018 Coastal Field Trips

Coastal Field Trips: Wednesday, August 1, 2018

All field trips will depart PSU at 8:00 am and arrive back in Portland at around 10:30 – 11:00 pm


1. Haystack Rock and Cape Falcon Marine Reserve

Depart from PSU; 8:00 am– 4:30 pm

During the Haystack Rock tidepool tour, participants will learn about the abundance of marine life found at Haystack Rock and the Haystack Rock Awareness Program, in its 33rd season, which focuses on positive, marine-based educational experiences through hands on learning, citizen science, art, inclusivity and stewardship. Having educated over one million visitors, HRAP Staff and Volunteers know that life on the coastal edge is rarely easy for marine animals, but unique adaptabilities have made life in this incredibly beautiful and diverse place a possibility. Learn more during this up-close journey through the rocky intertidal wonderland found at Haystack Rock. Enjoy the awe-inspiring seabirds who nest at the Rock. Furthermore, learn about ways in which you can be a better steward of this unique place and how local citizens are making positive impacts through inventive art and science initiatives.

Located in the ocean between Manzanita and Cannon Beach, Oregon, the Cape Falcon Marine Reserve site is a 20 square mile area dedicated to conservation and scientific research. Just like parks and protected natural areas on land, there are multiple benefits of protected areas in the ocean. They conserve ocean wildlife and biodiversity. Marine Reserves sites also serve as living laboratories, where we can learn about marine reserve protections and Oregon’s ocean environment to help us maintain our seas for future generations. The marine reserve is managed by Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. The Friends Group is comprised of volunteer citizens and organizations working to increase understanding and appreciation of the marine reserve. The Friends coordinate education events and promote scientific research in the area through a number of citizen science projects.

Participants will take a fun hike out to Audubon’s monitoring site at Devil’s Cauldron in Oswald West State Park where they will eat a boxed lunch from PSU.  Devil’s Cauldron is a short (0.25 miles), easy hike open to all ages. Experience the unique story of our coastline, from natural history to ongoing land and ocean conservation activities, including the new Cape Falcon Marine Reserve and Audubon Society of Portland’s efforts to monitor seabirds

If you’re up for more, continue on Elk Flats Trail for a 1.5-mile moderate to difficult hike to Short Sands Beach and the rest of the day’s festivities. The ElkFlats Trail, which leads hikers through a variety of forest structures, stunning old growth trees, and to vistas of the marine reserve, is steep in some sections. Hikers should prepare for slick, muddy trails and to scamper over and under sizable fallen trees. Please wear sturdy shoes, dress for coastal Oregon weather, and bring water.

Participants have the option of an alternative shorter, easier stroll from the Short Sands Parking lot down to the beach where they will discover be lead on a “foraging” tour down to Short Sands. This tour will detail local edible plants. Other biodiversity will be detailed as participants meander the short walk down to the beach.


2. Haystack Rock and Wildlife Center of the North Coast

Depart from PSU; 8:00 am– 4:30 pm

During the Haystack Rock tidepool tour, participants will learn about the abundance of marine life found at Haystack Rock and the Haystack Rock Awareness Program, in its 33rd season, which focuses on positive, marine-based educational experiences through hands on learning, citizen science, art, inclusivity and stewardship. Having educated over one million visitors, HRAP Staff and Volunteers know that life on the coastal edge is rarely easy for marine animals, but unique adaptabilities have made life in this incredibly beautiful and diverse place a possibility. Learn more during this up-close journey through the rocky intertidal wonderland found at Haystack Rock. Enjoy the awe-inspiring seabirds who nest at the Rock. Furthermore, learn about ways in which you can be a better steward of this unique place and how local citizens are making positive impacts through inventive art and science initiatives.

After an incredible tide pool tour at Haystack Rock, participants will travel up to the Necanicum estuary in Seaside, where they will break for lunch. Binoculars will be provided for participants to use to observe wildlife and spot various birds who are often seen in this diverse ecosystem. Expert local birders, will assist participants in spotting birds and will detail various wildlife found at this location.

Upon leaving the Necanicum estuary, participants will travel up to the Wildlife Center of the North Coast to explore their facilities and view many of their successfully recovered birds. The Wildlife Center of the North Coast (WCNC) is a registered 501(c)3 non-profit organization based in Astoria, Oregon. They rescue and rehabilitate injured, sick, orphaned and displaced native wildlife with the goal of releasing healthy, strong creatures back into their appropriate habitat. The WCNC is the only wildlife care hospital on the Central and North Oregon coast, serving communities from as far south as Newport, OR all the way up to the Long Beach Peninsula in Washington. The center specializes in seabird rehabilitation, but provides professional medical care for all native wild birds and mammals needing our help. They receive an average of 2,000 patients annually.  A variety of seabirds, raptors, ducks, songbirds and mammals come through our doors every year, each in need of some kind of care.  Whether injured, sick, starving or orphaned, the center works hard to take care of their every need, get them healthy, and released back into the wild where they belong.

2018 Lodging & Travel Information

Lodging

Conference housing for the 2018 conference is available through Portland State University. Use the Portland State University Summer Housing & Conferences website to reserve a residence hall room. A minimum stay of 3 nights is required.

Rooms can be used for one or two people and all come with twin beds. All rooms have private bathrooms. Linen and towels are provided to all guests. Lamps and fans are provided, but the rooms are not air conditioned. Guests are able to access the campus network both via WiFi and Ethernet. The Broadway building has rooms with kitchenettes and mini-refrigerator.

If you have any questions about housing, please contact us at shc@pdx.edu.


Getting Around

Portland State University Interactive Campus Map | PDF Map

TriMet Trip Planner

2018 Pre-conference Workshops

Friday, July 27, 2018

Using ArcGIS Online to Collect, Analyze, and Share Data

9:30 am to 3:30 pm
Water Resources Center, Vancouver, WA

Join us for this free hands-on STEAM workshop at the beautiful Water Resources Center on the Columbia where we will explore how to use ArcGIS Online and a variety of other methods to collect, analyze, and share data. Janice Elvidge from the National Park Service will team up with Rick Reynolds from Engaging Every Student and other partners of The River Mile project to show how GIS and other tools can be used to engage students in important real-life science investigations while meeting the Next Generation Science Standards and Common Core State Standards. Learn how The River Mile’s network of schools has been helping biologists and wildlife managers by collecting and presenting data on native and invasive crayfish, and how ArcGIS can be used to implement countless other meaningful scientific inquiries with students. Participants will create ArcGIS maps and add information and data layers to them, in addition to utilizing other digital and non-digital data analysis tools.

Space is limited, so please RSVP to Janice Elvidge with your name and organization: Janice_Elvidge@nps.gov.

Saturday, July 28, 2018

Engaging Students with Crayfish and Water Quality Monitoring

9:30 am to 3:30 pm
Water Resources Center, Vancouver, WA

Learn to engage students in fascinating crayfish studies and water quality monitoring in this hands-on STEAM workshop with partners from The River Mile Network. Janice Elvidge from the National Park Service will team up with Debra Berg, veteran teacher from Columbia High School, Cory Samia from the Water Resources Education Center, and Rick Reynolds from Engaging Every Student to step you through student activities including scientific investigations in your local watershed to benefit people and wildlife. Learn methods to monitor native and invasive crayfish, as well as a variety of factors which impact water quality, while meeting the Next Generation Science Standards and Common Core State Standards. Learn about ways to participate with The River Mile’s project helping biologists and wildlife managers, and how different tools can be used to collect, analyze, and share data and student observations.

Space is limited, so please RSVP here, or send questions to Janice Elvidge: Janice_Elvidge@nps.gov. Participants are asked to bring their own tablet and/or other mobile devices, if possible.

2018 Freshwater Field Trips

Freshwater Field Trips: Tuesday, July 31, 2018


1. Ridgefield Wildlife Refuge—Kayaking and Cultural Tour

$64/person

Vans depart from PSU; 8:30 am – 4:00 pm

In the morning, we will take a guided kayak tour with wildlife viewing on Lake River in Ridgefield, Washington. In the afternoon, we will visit the Cathlapotle Plankhouse on Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge and participate in unique opportunities for cultural and environmental education in the Columbia River Floodplain that are not matched anywhere in the region. Learn how these programs have been recently revitalized to better align with current standards and stay true to the indigenous legacy of land management along the Lower Columbia River. Limit 22 participants.


2. Tour of the Bull Run Watershed

$20/person

Bus departs from PSU; 9:00 am – 5:00 pm

Join interpreters from the Portland Water Bureau on a journey behind the scenes at Portland’s own water supply system. It’s not snow melt! Visit the pristine, gated valley that collects and naturally filters rainwater through forest soils. Tour the dam, see the vast reservoir, learn the history of water delivery to the city. Discuss the treatment of water prior to entering the big pipes, and current issues such as filtration and cryptosporidium. Learn and share your knowledge. Limit 24 participants.


3. Cycling the Riverfront

FREE!

Departs from PSU @ 2:30 pm

Join Oregon Zoo Educator and long-standing NAME member Tom Gaskill on a tour of our urban riverfront on Portland’s own public bicycle fleet. On this relaxed pedal along the Willamette River bike paths, we will learn about innovative planning and infrastructure Portland has developed to protect water quality, encourage active transportation, and improve livability for our residents. The trip ends back in town on the East Bank at the Hair of the Dog brewpub for happy hour, and then back to PSU.  Participants will receive a free day-long bike pass to use a Bike Town bike for the day of the field trip. Many thanks to BIKETOWN, Portland’s bike share program, for providing the bikes for this field trip!


4. Tryon Creek State Park

FREE!

Trimet from PSU; On your own, times open

Visit this gem of an urban natural area located nearby, next to Lewis and Clark College. Explore the visitor’s center, learn of the park’s history and its educational programs. Take a hike on one of many looped trails, and observe the restoration efforts of the past, largely done by volunteer and school groups, from trail maintenance to exotic-invasive species removal, to the planting of natives and stream habitat improvement.


5. The Willamette River in Big Canoes w/Lower Columbia Estuary Partnership

FREE!

Trimet from PSU; 8:30 – 1:30 + eating picnic sack lunches on Ross Island during trip

Paddle the river to key local destinations in the city. Explore the history of the river and its development. See the rookeries on Ross Island, where many Great Blue Heron and a few bald eagles nest. Discuss river issues through time, problems and solutions, and current challenges. Spit in the river. For more information, including what to bring, please visit the Lower Columbia Estuary Partnership Canoe Paddles page. Limit 24 participants.


6. Secret Places on Sauvie Island

$20/person

Vans depart from PSU; 9:00 am – 3:00 pm

Join Pat Willis and Amber Horn touring and discussing Place-based Education at the Sauvie Island Wildlife Refuge, the  largest wildlife refuge in the Portland area. The group will travel to the far northern end of the island along the Columbia River to Ruby Lake, a 126 acre wetland restoration project connected to tide changes along the Columbia River.  See how the area has changed and learn how the 7th and 8th grade students from Sauvie Island School participated. Along the way, we will also visit the Dairy Creek project, a $6 million mile long restoration project Sauvie Island school students are correctly working on. Some hiking will be needed. Limit 22 participants


7. Columbia River Gorge Tour

$20/person

Van departs PSU; 9:00 am – 4:00 pm

Take the old scenic highway! See the new State Park at the CONFLUENCE of the Sandy and the Columbia. Learn the geology of the Sandy River Canyon and of river issues over time. Visit a “ghost forest” left by lahars from Mt. Hood’s previous eruptions. See spectacular views from the cliffs of Women’s Forum State Park and Crown Point, a brief history of both sites and an overview of the Ice Age Floods that authored the gorge. See several waterfalls including Multnomah Falls. Eat lunch in Cascade Locks Park and discuss the legend of the Bridge of the Gods, evidence for a massive landslide that indeed may have dammed the river there and narrowed the channel to its present state. Eat a great ice cream cone at Marie’s East Wind Drive In. Limit 22 participants.

2018 Presentation Information

The Northwest Aquatic and Marine Educators (NAME) invites you to present at our 43rd Annual Conference, entitled “Confluence.”  This year’s conference, hosted by the Oregon Chapter, will take place in Portland, Oregon from July 29 through August 2, 2018.

NAME was founded in 1976 and became a chapter of the National Marine Educators Association (NMEA) in 1980 dedicated to supporting water literacy in the Pacific Northwest.  Originally, NAME focused mainly on marine ecology, education and environmental issues. Then, in the early 1990s, NAME expanded its mission and membership to include all aquatic environments – saltwater, freshwater and everything in between.  As the name suggests, NAME spans the entire bioregion of the Pacific Northwest coast of North America comprising four chapters: Alaska, British Columbia, Washington, and Oregon. As such, NAME pushes for education, research and advocacy beyond political boundaries and is one of only two international NMEA chapters with Canadian representation.

Confluence” is an all-encompassing theme. It refers to the point at which two or more bodies of water meet and flow together.  It also refers to the process of merging ideas toward common understanding and to the creation of community from diverse perspectives.

For this conference, three strands will also be woven into metaphorical confluence: Education, Culture and Science.

  • Education—Topics with a focus on prepared materials for educators fulfilling the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) and Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) opportunities.
  • Culture—This includes topics with a keen focus on the traditional, indigenous knowledge, and/or the role of art in environmental education, STEAM, (includes artistic innovation).
  • Science—Topics elaborating the most up-to-date scientific knowledge/discoveries giving educators the background and tools needed to fulfill STEM and NGSS.

We encourage any and all topics to be presented that represent one or more of these strands.


Oral Presentations and Workshops 

Monday, July 30 & Thursday, August 2

Presentations should be either 45 or 90 minutes. This year, presenters will be asked to highlight their presentation with a 5-minute “preview” at the morning plenary session, so that all participants get a sense of the concurrent options before we break out into sessions. Presenters are encouraged to collaborate with other educators and to run presentations that are as hands-on as possible! Power-point discussions on a theme relevant to the conference are also welcome.


Poster Presentations/Sea Faire

Wednesday, August 1

Poster presentations and Sea Faire will be held during the dinner and auction. Sea Faire is a marketplace of ‘ideas’ where individuals, agencies, organizations and vendors can share educational programs, equipment, curricula, and other materials appropriate for marine and aquatic educators and is intended to allow participants to share resources and ideas. Participants in Sea Faire who wish to sell items are welcome to do so but are encouraged to keep the items for sale relevant to the conference and the NAME organization.


Please submit proposals online on the NAME website (preferred), or complete the Call for Proposals form (available soon) and return via e-mail to: oregon@pacname.org

Application deadline is May 31, 2018

Questions? Contact Melissa Keyser at oregon@pacname.org

2018 Conference Schedule

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Save the Date – Oregon 2018

Save the Date: July 29-August 2, 2018, Portland, Oregon

The NAME-Oregon team is hard at work planning an exciting conference in 2018! Please check back for more details about the conference—including presentations, lodging, and registration information—as they become available.

NAME Auction

The annual NAME auction is one of the highlights of the conference….a chance to have fun, bid on unique aquatic-themed items donated by NAME members and local businesses, and raise money for our mini-grant and scholarship fund! All of the funds raised at our annual silent and live auction go to support educators with scholarships and mini-grants to help them share the wonders of the world of water.

Have an auction item to donate? Download and fill out the form below and submit it with your item at check-in. For donation or auction information, contact Fawn Custer at (541) 270.0027 or envtgsldrfawn@aol.com. Here are some ideas for great “aquatic” auction items: jewelry; outdoor gear; any and all crafts/artwork; gift certificates for whale watching, fishing trips, bird watching, cabin/hotel/motel accommodations, or guided outdoor trips. There may be treasures in your attic just waiting for the NAME Auction! Solicitation of auction items on behalf of NAME is highly appreciated. You can learn more about our organization at www.pacname.org.


Auction Donation Form