Field Trips: Tuesday, August 13, 2019

Please note, more field trips details will be added as they are finalized. You are welcome to complete your registration without adding any field trips; send an email to registration@pacname.org at any time to add or change a field trip on your registration, or to add a guest to a field trip.


1. Elwha River Trip (Full day—offsite)
The Elwha Ecosystem Restoration Project is a 21st-century project of the U.S. National Park Service to remove two dams on the Elwha River on the Olympic Peninsula in Washington state, and restore the river to a natural state. It is the largest dam removal project in history and the second largest ecosystem restoration project in the history of the National Park Service, after the Restoration of the Everglades. We’ll depart Port Townsend in the morning via shuttle and join experts along several points of interest along the Elwha River and learn more about this tremendous restoration project.   Please note: this an all day field trip.

Cost: $40 per person


2. Kayaking Port Townsend (2-3 hours, morning—onsite @ Fort Worden)
Paddle along the beautiful shoreline of Fort Worden and learn about the natural history of the Salish Sea including seabirds, intertidal life and the marine mammals that call these waters home. No previous padding experience necessary. Please dress to get wet and be sure to wear plenty of sunscreen.

Cost: $60 per person


3. Low Tide Beach Walks (2-3 hours, morning—onsite @ Fort Worden) [low tide 9:27am (-0.81ft)]

Explore the ebbs and flows of the marine coastal environment on a low tide walk led by Port Townsend Marine Science Center naturalists. Meet at the Marine Science Center located at the Fort, and explore tide pools and learn about how marine organisms are adapted for the challenges of living in the intertidal zone. Weather-appropriate clothing and shoes with good traction for moving around on wet slippery rocks are recommended.

Cost: Free


4. Western Flyer Tour (1-2 hours, afternoon—offsite, in Port Townsend)FULL
The Western Flyer is a fishing boat, most known for its use by John Steinbeck and Ed Ricketts in their 1940 expedition to the Gulf of California. The Western Flyer Foundation was formed in its honor with the goal of educating youth about the intersection of science and literature. Join Chris Chase , the Project Director for the Foundation and a longtime shipwright, on a tour of that will share the history, restoration process and the exciting future of the Western Flyer.

This is a mid-afternoon field trip so it could be paired with another morning field trip.

This field trip has reached capacity and will no longer be available for new registrants


5. Northwest Maritime Center Facility and Pilothouse Simulator Tour (1 hour, afternoon—offsite, in Port Townsend):

Come learn about the maritime education programs going on at Northwest Maritime Center on the waterfront in downtown Port Townsend. See summer sailing programs and youth camps in action. Visit our boatshop where wooden boats are being built and repaired. Visit the pilothouse simulator that simulates a ship’s bridge used for Merchant Mariner’s training. Note: this field trip can be paired with the Western Flyer afternoon field trip

Cost: $10


6. Historic Longboat Expedition (3 hours, afternoon—offsite, in Port Townsend)

Head out rowing and sailing aboard a historic 26 foot long wooden vessel patterned after Captain George Vancouver’s ship’s boats. These boats are used as modern exploration platforms for students aged 12 and older to learn how to work together as a crew and develop awareness of the local marine environment and navigation. Learn about the unique programs that NWMC offers in partnership with local and regional schools.

Cost: $50 

Dr. Deborah Giles

Science & Research Director, Wild Orca

Dr. Deborah Giles (she goes by her last name) received her PhD from the University of California Davis in 2014. Her master’s thesis and PhD dissertation both focused on the federally listed southern resident killer whales. Formerly the research director at the Center for Whale Research, she is currently a resident scientist and lecturer at the University of Washington’s Friday Harbor Labs, where she teaches Marine Mammals of the Salish Sea and Marine Biology. Since 2009 Giles has been the vessel captain for Dr. Samuel Wasser’s project – University of Washington’s Center for Conservation Biology – utilizing a scat detection dog to locate floating killer whale scat to monitor the physiological health of southern resident killer whales.

Starting in 2010, Giles also began work with an ongoing collaborative project with Cascadia Research Collective and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s National Marine Fisheries Service deploying acoustic suction-cup recording tags on killer whales to measure received noise levels by whales. Giles is the killer whale scientific adviser for the Orca Salmon Alliance, a program advisor for Killer Whale Tales, and is on the Steering Committee for the Salish Sea Ecosystem Advocates (SalishSEA).


Jessica Plumb

Director / Writer / Producer, Plumb Productions

Jessica Plumb is an award-winning filmmaker and writer, known for exploring the relationship between people and place. She is the Producer, Co-Director and writer of Return of the River, a feature documentary about the restoration of the Elwha River, and the largest dam removal in history. Recognized with a dozen festival awards, including “Best Storytelling” by the International Wildlife Film Festival, the film was reviewed as “hell-raising documentary filmmaking at its best”. Her short environmental films and video installations, described as video poetry, have screened in galleries and theaters throughout the United States and internationally. Plumb directs a video production company that creates educational and promotional films for clients. Her freelance writing has been published in the Seattle Times op-ed pages, Mountaineers Magazine, and Boston Sunday Globe among others. Before moving to the Olympic Peninsula, she worked in Boston and Beijing, and served as interim editor of the Yale China Review. Plumb holds a B.A. from Yale University and an interdisciplinary MFA from Goddard College.

The more detailed conference schedule will be available soon. Below is the general schedule for the conference.

Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday
11-Aug 12-Aug 13-Aug 14-Aug 15-Aug
Morning Activity Board Meeting Keynote and Sessions I Field Trips Sessions III Keynote and All Hands General Meeting
Afternoon Activity Registration/ Board Meeting Sessions II Field Trips Sessions IV Sessions V
Evening Activity Welcome Reception @ Port Townsend Marine Science Center Early Evening Poster Session followed by BBQ at beach Explore PT for dinner on your own! Auction and Banquet at NW Maritime Center Closing Remarks and Departure

Lodging

Lodging is still available on a first come, first served basis! Lodging will be in the Fort Worden dormitories, which were built in 1904 and originally served as barracks for soldiers stationed at the Fort. Both single and double rooms are available with shard bathrooms down the hall. Lodging cost includes breakfast. Guest lodging can be purchased during registration. Please contact us if you have any questions about lodging or meals during the conference.

Single Occupancy Double Occupancy
Full Conference $400 $330
Two Days (Sun-Tue or Tue-Thu) $200 $165

Lodging Cancellation Policy:

  • Lodging cancellations submitted by May 3, 2019 will be refunded.
  • Lodging cancellations submitted May 3, 2019 through July 8, 2019 will be refunded 50%.
  • No refunds for cancellations after July 8, 2019.

Camping

A limited number of camping spots at Fort Worden have been reserved for the conference. If you are interested in registering for a tent site, or a motor vehicle site, please contact Casey Ralston.


Getting Around

Registration options

Full Conference Registration—includes all sessions, lunches, and evening events from Sunday evening, August 11 through Thursday lunch, August 15, including the NAME Awards Banquet and Auction.

Two-day Registration—includes all of the following, plus the option to join us on the field trips!

  • Sun-Tue: all sessions, lunches, and evening events from Sunday evening, August 11 through Tuesday lunch, August 13
  • Tue-Thu: all sessions, lunches, and evening events from Tuesday lunch, August 13 through Thursday lunch, August 15, including the NAME Awards Banquet and Auction.

Single-day Registration—includes all sessions plus lunch on the day registered. Available for Monday, Wednesday, or Thursday.

Membership Renewal

Registering as a member does not include NAME membership renewal. Please add your membership renewal during registration, if desired.

NAME Member Non-member
Full Conference
Early-bird (through May 3, 2019) $275 $305
Regular (beginning May 4, 2019) $350 $380
Two Day: Sun (8/11) through Tue (8/13)
Early-bird (through May 3, 2019) $155 $185
Regular (beginning May 4, 2019) $230 $260
Two Day: Tue (8/13) through Thu (8/15)
Early-bird (through May 3, 2019) $200 $230
Regular (beginning May 4, 2019) $275 $305
One Day: Mon (8/12), Wed (8/14), or Thu (8/15)
Early-bird (through May 3, 2019) $75 $105
Regular (beginning May 4, 2019) $130 $160
Event tickets for guests/family members
Evening BBQ (Monday, Aug 12) $15
NAME Awards Banquet and Auction (Wednesday, Aug 14) $50

Lodging

Conference registration does not include lodging, which can be purchased during registration and includes breakfast. Lodging information can be found on our Travel & Lodging page. Lodging is still available on a first come, first served basis!


Cancellation Policy:

Conference Registration:

  • Registration cancellations submitted by May 3, 2019 will be refunded.
  • Registration cancellations submitted May 3, 2019 through July 8, 2019 will be refunded 50%.
  • No refunds for cancellations after July 8, 2019.

If you are paying by check (US funds, payable to Northwest Aquatic and Marine Educators) or purchase order, please send your payment to NAME-Washington:

Suzi Wong Swint/NAME
21617 Starbrook Lane
Mount Vernon, WA 98274 

Submit Proposal

The Northwest Aquatic and Marine Educators (NAME) invites you to present at our 44th Annual Conference, “Voyaging Through Changing Waters.”  This year’s conference will be held August 11-15, 2019 at Fort Worden State Park in Port Townsend, Washington.

NAME was founded in 1976 and became a chapter of the National Marine Educators Association (NMEA) in 1980 dedicated to supporting water literacy in the Pacific Northwest.  Originally, NAME focused mainly on marine ecology, education and environmental issues. Then, in the early 1990s, NAME expanded its mission and membership to include all aquatic environments – saltwater, freshwater and everything in between.  As the name suggests, NAME spans the entire bioregion of the Pacific Northwest coast of North America comprising four chapters: Alaska, British Columbia, Washington, and Oregon. As such, NAME pushes for education, research and advocacy beyond political boundaries and is one of only two international NMEA chapters with Canadian representation.

2019 Conference Strands:

Connecting cultures and communities

Do your programs reflect the diverse communities of your area? Do you address social justice and equity issues in aquatic and marine science programming? How do you make sure your curriculum is culturally sensitive and relevant to the students you serve?  Share your tips, techniques and lessons learned for successfully connecting all learners with the aquatic world.

Innovative Teaching, Research and Restoration

Do you have a cool or new science lesson, restoration project, citizen science program, or community art project to share? Are you incorporating the latest breaking research into your teaching or bringing specialists into your classroom? We are looking for teachers, informal educators, researchers or marine science loving citizens who want to share an innovative new idea or project they have been working on.

Place-Based Learning

Do you teach using your local community and landscape? How do you incorporate “calls to action” and solutions in discussions about human impacts on aquatic and marine ecosystems?  Share your knowledge and tips about programming in your local setting and how you make the connection to our one big ocean.

We encourage any and all topics to be presented that represent one or more of these strands.


There are three presentation formats: Oral Presentation, Hands-on Workshop or Poster presentation.   We encourage you to collaborate with other educators on presentations to present multiple perspectives and/or offer panel discussions on similar programming. If you would like to be grouped with educators presenting on similar topics, select “15 minutes” for your presentation time and NAME will connect you with two other presenters.

Most presentation rooms will have WiFi, a computer and a projector. Please bring presentations on a memory stick, USB Flash drive, or disk.   The conference building is surrounded by a patio and grassy outdoor spaces if your presentation requires time outside of the classroom.

Oral Presentations: (15 or 45 minute sessions)
Monday 8/12/19, Tuesday 8/13/19 & Wednesday 8/14/19
Standard classroom presentations.

Hands-On Workshops: (45 minute sessions)
Monday 8/12/19, Tuesday 8/13/19 & Wednesday 8/14/19
No PowerPoints allowed! Share your favorite hands-on marine and aquatic lessons, activities, or art projects with your colleagues. If you need access to water in your presentation room, please indicate below.  Past hands on sessions have featured: squid dissections, octopus parachute fun, surface tension experiments, salmon life cycle games, art projects and more.

Poster:
Monday evening 8/12/19
The poster session is an engaging way to share education, research, or citizen science projects.  This evening session will provide an opportunity for conference participants to learn more about current projects and to talk directly with scientists and educators during an informal evening reception.  If you are selected to present a poster, we will provide additional information regarding set-up and take-down process, approximate size of the posters, and how posters will be mounted and displayed. No A/V equipment will be available during this session.

Please submit proposals by April 1, 2019.

Proposals can be submitted via this online form.

Questions? Contact Amy Sprenger at president@pacname.org or 206-280-9850 or Casey Ralston at caseyral3@gmail.com or 206-817-6834

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We will be offering the following registration options:

Full Conference Registration—includes all sessions, events and meals* from Sunday evening, July 29 through Thursday lunch, August 2, including the NAME Awards Banquet and Auction. *Conference registration does not include dinner on Monday & Tuesday evenings, or any of the freshwater field trips on Tuesday.

Single-day Registration—includes all sessions, plus lunch and coffee breaks only on the day/s registered. Available for Mon, Wed, Thu only. Registration for Monday includes the Sunday Reception & Dinner at the Oregon Zoo. Registration for Wednesday includes the Coastal Field Trip & NAME Awards Banquet and Auction.

NAME Member Non-member
Full Conference
Regular (beginning May 1, 2017) $275 $300
Single Day
Mon (7/30), Wed (8/1), or Thu (8/2) $125 $150
Extras
Sunday Reception & Dinner at the Oregon Zoo – guest ticket $35
NAME Awards Banquet and Auction (Wednesday) – guest ticket $30

Cancellation of Conference Registration:
Cancellations submitted by July 23, 2018 will be refunded.
No refunds for cancellations after July 23, 2018.

If you are paying by check (US funds, payable to Northwest Aquatic and Marine Educators) or purchase order, please send your payment to NAME-Oregon:

Fawn Custer – NAME Oregon Treasurer
PO Box 90
Seal Rock, OR 97376

541.270.0027
envtgsldrfawn@aol.com

Fax 541.563.6851 – upon request 

Coastal Field Trips: Wednesday, August 1, 2018

All field trips will depart PSU at 8:00 am and arrive back in Portland at around 10:30 – 11:00 pm


1. Haystack Rock and Cape Falcon Marine Reserve

Depart from PSU; 8:00 am– 4:30 pm

During the Haystack Rock tidepool tour, participants will learn about the abundance of marine life found at Haystack Rock and the Haystack Rock Awareness Program, in its 33rd season, which focuses on positive, marine-based educational experiences through hands on learning, citizen science, art, inclusivity and stewardship. Having educated over one million visitors, HRAP Staff and Volunteers know that life on the coastal edge is rarely easy for marine animals, but unique adaptabilities have made life in this incredibly beautiful and diverse place a possibility. Learn more during this up-close journey through the rocky intertidal wonderland found at Haystack Rock. Enjoy the awe-inspiring seabirds who nest at the Rock. Furthermore, learn about ways in which you can be a better steward of this unique place and how local citizens are making positive impacts through inventive art and science initiatives.

Located in the ocean between Manzanita and Cannon Beach, Oregon, the Cape Falcon Marine Reserve site is a 20 square mile area dedicated to conservation and scientific research. Just like parks and protected natural areas on land, there are multiple benefits of protected areas in the ocean. They conserve ocean wildlife and biodiversity. Marine Reserves sites also serve as living laboratories, where we can learn about marine reserve protections and Oregon’s ocean environment to help us maintain our seas for future generations. The marine reserve is managed by Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. The Friends Group is comprised of volunteer citizens and organizations working to increase understanding and appreciation of the marine reserve. The Friends coordinate education events and promote scientific research in the area through a number of citizen science projects.

Participants will take a fun hike out to Audubon’s monitoring site at Devil’s Cauldron in Oswald West State Park where they will eat a boxed lunch from PSU.  Devil’s Cauldron is a short (0.25 miles), easy hike open to all ages. Experience the unique story of our coastline, from natural history to ongoing land and ocean conservation activities, including the new Cape Falcon Marine Reserve and Audubon Society of Portland’s efforts to monitor seabirds

If you’re up for more, continue on Elk Flats Trail for a 1.5-mile moderate to difficult hike to Short Sands Beach and the rest of the day’s festivities. The ElkFlats Trail, which leads hikers through a variety of forest structures, stunning old growth trees, and to vistas of the marine reserve, is steep in some sections. Hikers should prepare for slick, muddy trails and to scamper over and under sizable fallen trees. Please wear sturdy shoes, dress for coastal Oregon weather, and bring water.

Participants have the option of an alternative shorter, easier stroll from the Short Sands Parking lot down to the beach where they will discover be lead on a “foraging” tour down to Short Sands. This tour will detail local edible plants. Other biodiversity will be detailed as participants meander the short walk down to the beach.


2. Haystack Rock and Wildlife Center of the North Coast

Depart from PSU; 8:00 am– 4:30 pm

During the Haystack Rock tidepool tour, participants will learn about the abundance of marine life found at Haystack Rock and the Haystack Rock Awareness Program, in its 33rd season, which focuses on positive, marine-based educational experiences through hands on learning, citizen science, art, inclusivity and stewardship. Having educated over one million visitors, HRAP Staff and Volunteers know that life on the coastal edge is rarely easy for marine animals, but unique adaptabilities have made life in this incredibly beautiful and diverse place a possibility. Learn more during this up-close journey through the rocky intertidal wonderland found at Haystack Rock. Enjoy the awe-inspiring seabirds who nest at the Rock. Furthermore, learn about ways in which you can be a better steward of this unique place and how local citizens are making positive impacts through inventive art and science initiatives.

After an incredible tide pool tour at Haystack Rock, participants will travel up to the Necanicum estuary in Seaside, where they will break for lunch. Binoculars will be provided for participants to use to observe wildlife and spot various birds who are often seen in this diverse ecosystem. Expert local birders, will assist participants in spotting birds and will detail various wildlife found at this location.

Upon leaving the Necanicum estuary, participants will travel up to the Wildlife Center of the North Coast to explore their facilities and view many of their successfully recovered birds. The Wildlife Center of the North Coast (WCNC) is a registered 501(c)3 non-profit organization based in Astoria, Oregon. They rescue and rehabilitate injured, sick, orphaned and displaced native wildlife with the goal of releasing healthy, strong creatures back into their appropriate habitat. The WCNC is the only wildlife care hospital on the Central and North Oregon coast, serving communities from as far south as Newport, OR all the way up to the Long Beach Peninsula in Washington. The center specializes in seabird rehabilitation, but provides professional medical care for all native wild birds and mammals needing our help. They receive an average of 2,000 patients annually.  A variety of seabirds, raptors, ducks, songbirds and mammals come through our doors every year, each in need of some kind of care.  Whether injured, sick, starving or orphaned, the center works hard to take care of their every need, get them healthy, and released back into the wild where they belong.

Lodging

Conference housing for the 2018 conference is available through Portland State University. Use the Portland State University Summer Housing & Conferences website to reserve a residence hall room. A minimum stay of 3 nights is required.

Rooms can be used for one or two people and all come with twin beds. All rooms have private bathrooms. Linen and towels are provided to all guests. Lamps and fans are provided, but the rooms are not air conditioned. Guests are able to access the campus network both via WiFi and Ethernet. The Broadway building has rooms with kitchenettes and mini-refrigerator.

If you have any questions about housing, please contact us at shc@pdx.edu.

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Getting Around

Portland State University Interactive Campus Map | PDF Map

TriMet Trip Planner

Friday, July 27, 2018

Using ArcGIS Online to Collect, Analyze, and Share Data

9:30 am to 3:30 pm
Water Resources Center, Vancouver, WA

Join us for this free hands-on STEAM workshop at the beautiful Water Resources Center on the Columbia where we will explore how to use ArcGIS Online and a variety of other methods to collect, analyze, and share data. Janice Elvidge from the National Park Service will team up with Rick Reynolds from Engaging Every Student and other partners of The River Mile project to show how GIS and other tools can be used to engage students in important real-life science investigations while meeting the Next Generation Science Standards and Common Core State Standards. Learn how The River Mile’s network of schools has been helping biologists and wildlife managers by collecting and presenting data on native and invasive crayfish, and how ArcGIS can be used to implement countless other meaningful scientific inquiries with students. Participants will create ArcGIS maps and add information and data layers to them, in addition to utilizing other digital and non-digital data analysis tools.

Space is limited, so please RSVP to Janice Elvidge with your name and organization: Janice_Elvidge@nps.gov.

Saturday, July 28, 2018

Engaging Students with Crayfish and Water Quality Monitoring

9:30 am to 3:30 pm
Water Resources Center, Vancouver, WA

Learn to engage students in fascinating crayfish studies and water quality monitoring in this hands-on STEAM workshop with partners from The River Mile Network. Janice Elvidge from the National Park Service will team up with Debra Berg, veteran teacher from Columbia High School, Cory Samia from the Water Resources Education Center, and Rick Reynolds from Engaging Every Student to step you through student activities including scientific investigations in your local watershed to benefit people and wildlife. Learn methods to monitor native and invasive crayfish, as well as a variety of factors which impact water quality, while meeting the Next Generation Science Standards and Common Core State Standards. Learn about ways to participate with The River Mile’s project helping biologists and wildlife managers, and how different tools can be used to collect, analyze, and share data and student observations.

Space is limited, so please RSVP here, or send questions to Janice Elvidge: Janice_Elvidge@nps.gov. Participants are asked to bring their own tablet and/or other mobile devices, if possible.